View your shopping bag

Items: (0) £0.00
  • €
  • $
  • £

Checkout

  • Anforme What impact might inward investment by multinationals have on developing countries?

Anforme What impact might inward investment by multinationals have on developing countries?

Media Type 1+ Horizontal Option Header Quantity Add to basket
  £0.85
  • Product Reference: Download: D43

 

Allan Hodge, Head of Economics, Cheltenham Ladies’ College, examines the potential benefits arising from inward foreign direct investment.

Summary of Key Points:

  • Foreign direct investment by private, multinational companies is one of several financial inflows that developing countries receive; its size is growing relative to official development assistance.
  • About one-third of world FDI goes to developing countries, but only about two percent to least developed countries; for both, and especially LDCs, it is a growing source of their investment funds.
  • The main benefits of FDI are through positive spillovers: the transfer of technology, skills and best business practice, and enhancing competition; MNCs may also help to bridge the revenue and foreign exchange gaps, and encourage better public policy-making.
  • A more liberal business climate may attract more dynamic, techno- logically advanced MNCs than a restrictive one, and will be a greater stimulus to growth and development.
  • A crucial factor in the relationship between FDI and growth is the ability of the country to ‘absorb’ new technology and business practice; in this, the quality of the country’s human capital is very important.

This article is from ET Volume 14 Issue 3.

 

Allan Hodge, Head of Economics, Cheltenham Ladies’ College, examines the potential benefits arising from inward foreign direct investment.

Summary of Key Points:

  • Foreign direct investment by private, multinational companies is one of several financial inflows that developing countries receive; its size is growing relative to official development assistance.
  • About one-third of world FDI goes to developing countries, but only about two percent to least developed countries; for both, and especially LDCs, it is a growing source of their investment funds.
  • The main benefits of FDI are through positive spillovers: the transfer of technology, skills and best business practice, and enhancing competition; MNCs may also help to bridge the revenue and foreign exchange gaps, and encourage better public policy-making.
  • A more liberal business climate may attract more dynamic, techno- logically advanced MNCs than a restrictive one, and will be a greater stimulus to growth and development.
  • A crucial factor in the relationship between FDI and growth is the ability of the country to ‘absorb’ new technology and business practice; in this, the quality of the country’s human capital is very important.

This article is from ET Volume 14 Issue 3.

long description

When the order is placed at our website, credit card numbers are encrypted using 128 bit encryption. They are only decrypted after they reach our computer. They are not held in clear text on any web site. Making a purchase could not be easier. Just browse our store, and add any items that you wish to buy into the shopping cart. After you have finished your selection, click on 'Checkout' and you will be asked for a few details that we need to be able to complete the order.

All the products on our website are always in stock. As soon as a product becomes out of stock we remove it from the website. You will never receive a message from us telling you that the product you ordered is not currently available. For internet orders, we aim for a dispatch within 24 hours although no orders will be dispatched at weekends. If, in the unlikely event that you find one of our products to be damaged or not up to the specifications quoted on this website, you may return it within 30 days for a full refund including postage. We regret that we cannot be held responsible for the non-delivery of returned goods so we recommend that you get a certificate of posting.